Flying Whales

lordelovee:

James vía instagram

lordelovee:

James vía instagram

(via lordeblogs)

thevictorianlady:

Snapshots of Virginia Woolf taken by Lady Ottoline Morrell, June 1923.

(via booklover)

(Source: jammywk, via necrotelecomnicon)

captaindwreck:

Details of the center piece of my newest painting.

captaindwreck:

Details of the center piece of my newest painting.

treeonthemountain:

Back To There by Black Eyed Suzy
jumblepusher:

Jacques Henri Lartigue. “Losers at the races at Auteuil”. 1911. Paris, France.

jumblepusher:

Jacques Henri Lartigue. “Losers at the races at Auteuil”. 1911. Paris, France.

adrians:

I realized how realistic club penguin was on my last trip to the zoo

adrians:

I realized how realistic club penguin was on my last trip to the zoo

(via preciousnugget)

madeofcelluloid:

'Only Lovers Left Alive', Jim Jarmusch (2013)

Eve: Her name is Yasmine. She’ll be famous one day.
Adam: I hope not. She’s too good to be famous.

(via thedepthofselfdelusion)

Deftones - Beware

galms:

Beware // Deftones

"Let’s pretend, really, really, babe."

(via mnrva)

(Source: sandandglass, via seasonsinthesky)

The Child of Light soundtrack is so pretty *_*

If pornography is increasingly cruel and degrading, why is it increasingly commonplace instead of more marginalized? In a society that purports to be civilized, wouldn’t we expect most people to reject sexual material that becomes ever more dismissive of the humanity of women? How do we explain the simultaneous appearance of more, and increasingly more intense, ways to humiliate women sexually and the rising popularity of the films that present those activities?

As is often the case, this paradox can be resolved by recognizing that one of the assumptions is wrong. Here, it’s the assumption that US society routinely rejects cruelty and degradation. In fact, the United States is a nation that has no serious objection to cruelty and degradation. Think of the way we accept the use of brutal weapons in war that kill civilians, or the way we accept the death penalty, or the way we accept crushing economic inequality. There is no paradox in the steady mainstreaming of an intensely cruel pornography. This is a culture with a well-developed legal regime that generally protects individuals’ rights and freedoms, and yet it also is a strikingly cruel culture in the way it accepts brutality and inequality. The pornographers are not a deviation from the norm. Their presence in the mainstream shouldn’t be surprising, because they represent mainstream values: the logic of domination and subordination that is central to patriarchy, hyper-patriotic nationalism, white supremacy, and a predatory corporate capitalism.